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Chapter 4

Romanticism

Romanticism was an anti-establishment movement characterized by ambiguity, complexity, and uncertainty. Romantic artists privileged individualism over convention. They experimented with new subject matter, compositions, and techniques in order to discover visual languages that effectively communicated their personal ideas and experiences.

Readings:

Aldrich, Megan. Gothic Revival. London: Phaidon, 1994

Boime, Albert. Art in the Age of Bonapartism, 1800-1815. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1990

Bryson, Norman. Tradition and Desire: From David to Delacroix. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1984

Burke, Edmund. A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origins of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757), Adam Philips, ed. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press,1990

Eitner, Lorenz. Neoclassicism and Romanticism 1750-1850, vol. 1: Enlightenment and Revolution. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall, 1970

Frank, Mitchell Benjamin. German Romantic Painting Redefined: Nazarene Tradition and the Narratives of Romanticism. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2001

Grewe, Cordula. Painting the Sacred in the Age of Romanticism. Farnham and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009

Hobsbawm, Eric. The Age of Revolution: 1789-1848. New York: Vintage Books

Morowitz, Laura. Artistic Brotherhoods in the Nineteenth Century. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2000

Paley, Morton D. The Apocalyptic Sublime. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 1986 

Ribner, Jonathan P. Broken Tablets: The Cult of the Law in French Art from David to Delacroix. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1993

Saul, Nicholas. The Cambridge Companion to German Romanticism. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009

Vaughan, William. Romanticism and Art. New York and London: Thames and Hudson, 1999

Wakefield, David F. The French Romantics: Literature and the Visual Arts, 1800-1840. London: Chaucer, 2007

Subtitle: 
Romanticism

Web Resources 

Metmuseum: Romanticism 

 

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